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20121210
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
december 17 to deal with the fiscal cliff. the house returned to business this week on tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern. they will be appointing members to work with the senate on defense programs. live coverage when the house returns here and c-span. the synod -- the senate returns on monday. they will also consider a nomination for assistant secretary of housing and development. live coverage when they return on c-span2. >> joining as and vermont is governor peter shumlin. thank you for being with us. >> it is great to be with you. thank you for being with us. let me begin with some news of the weekend. that is former republican gov. charlie crist is not a democrat. do you welcome him to the democratic party? is this setting the stage as a potential run as governor as a democrat nunn could 2014. >> he was hugely helpful in electing president obama. it is a great victory for us. he is an incredibly capable victor. we do not take sides before we know that we have one single candidate. everyone knows he was a great governor. he led florida with precision. if he is a candidate, we would welcom
. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has b
a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, wh
and the white house. house republican leaders have made a counter offer to president obama in the fiscal cliff negotiations proposing to cut to true knowledge with a combination of spending cuts come entitlement reform, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are
, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal slope, not a fiscal cliff. it is not like a zombie accomplice happens. if market confidence was up the window, that could be damaging. >> i think is likely there is going to be a deal, some other deadline for another deal next year. it is really important and they not said a whole series of opportunities to have that kind of collapse again. they have a couple months, but they have to make sure whenever they come up with for the last significant period of time. i think that will build confidence. i want to come back to the question of housing. i think is so important to overstate the importance of housing to the economy. especially from the starter business and start up perspective. those are the companies with a lot of job creation. they all grow very rapidly, sometimes growing into large companies. they are not starting up that high written all right now. a big chunk of that is confidence. folks often do not have financial resources. if there are looking at the value of their home and 401k, they are taking a risk. there are calculati
're not going over the fiscal cliff. if you look back at the history of in effect the immigration lottery system that we had, you'll find a lot of american entprures came through that program and this notion there is going to be a tradeoff, maybe preelection. that was the reality but not now. the change that took place on election day was these items like startup 2.0, serve for that. that's the starting point. dream act which i think is an embarrassment we didn't pass already, somebody who lives in a common wealth i see many kids grown up in virginia and gone to virginia hools and parents have paid taxes for years and in the process of trying to continue their american experience, we luckily were able to overturn legislation and try to exclude those folks from going to college. but that i think becomes now maybe not a given but it's sure as he can going to be fairly shortly. the chalsleng now going to be because there are these 11 million undocumented persons who work in america trying to sort through some path of legal status for those folks which i think has to be a national priority as well.
broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, halting employment growth, driving unemployment up instead of down, triggering a deep cuts to programs that families across the country count on. the job before the united states congress is to reach an agreement that builds on the economic progress that we are making, and puts us on a path to fiscal stability. we need to cut more spending, and generate more revenue. we need to do it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has p
:00 eastern. john boehner makes remarks on the fiscal cliff. we will show you that when the happens. by now, a little bit more about the fiscal cliff. >> we turn our attention this morning about unemployment benefits and how insurance could back -- how insurance could be impacted. thank you for coming in. we want to start the discussion. when we're talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are we talking about here? >> unemployment insurance is the combination of federal and state programs. it usually lasts up to six weeks. it can be extended up to 93 weeks, depending on which they were in. it is this extension that we're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from sta
on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and here is the song we sing to our twin boys actually about two years ago we went in to sing them to sleep with this lull by and we got the guitar out and sat down on the side of the bed and we were about to play the opening cords and rough fuss looked up at me and said you know dad, we don't have to do this anymore. ♪ ♪ >> good buy and thank you very much. >> among the iletms on the agenda next week appointing members to a committee to hash out an agreement it was defense bill next year. the house planned to adjourn for the holidays next week but the house will be back in session december 17 to deal with the s
governors are lobbying the white house on what they would like to see happen in some of the fiscal cliffs negotiations and some of the cut thass republicans and others want to make in these negotiations could impact state budgets. what do you see as your bottom line and what the cuts cannot do? -- or should not do. >> let's be clear about this, the president has this one right. we cannot balance this budget and make the changes we need to make in terms of the fiscal cliff, or or what i call the fiscal slope without ensuring that we ask the top 1% or 2% of the americans pay their fair share in income taxes. we all know that the top 1% or 2% is paying lower income taxes than any time in our history. they've had a great deal, president bush set that up for them but we as nation did better under the clinton tax policies where we asked the wealthy to pay their fair share and the result was economic prosperity. we can't balance the budget without having new revenue come from the wealthy. when you see the games they are play in congress right now to suggest you can do that with reductions and ot
of santa barbara. caller: we are in california here. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. so democrat parties are so good why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time that the unions instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns, give that money back to the membership so they can pay their own way? and as taxpayers and people like me that live on a fixed income don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we work hard to make? host: mr. welch. guest: first of all you have worked hard and -- but a couple things. number one, i can't comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. although the reports are things are starting to turn around a little bit there. and it's very tough to pass a budget when you've got that superis majority requirement. number two -- supermajority requirement. number two, how we got here, it's not unions. the wages for americans have been going down for the past 10, 15 years. people are not keeping up wi
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)